About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to focus attention on what a disaster that is. now, lastly, feature these geniuses in the republican party, the republican governors, there are 30 of them in the country right now. by the way, the most of any party in the country in more than a decade. some of the best minds, the most accomplished reformers in america are republican governors. and we've got bobby jindal, scott walker, rick scott, bob mcdonnell, sues anna martinez, rick perry, rick snyder and soon to be gone mitch daniels. and republican governors by and large are successful, they're popular, creative and for the most part found is way to govern in a responsible way so the republicans in the house and senate should work very closely with them, should align with them and learn from them. knew, this list of suggestions is only a partial list of starting points, other smart people will have good ideas as well. the point is, republicans, at every level they need to take a deep breath, they need to stop being reactive to everything that obama does and to events and they should calmly chart out and in a very careful way deliberat
and in and the hiring of future unauthorized workers and lastly, we established an improved process for admitting future workers to serve our nation's workforce needs while simultaneously protecting all workers. other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there is more political risk and opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. we believe we have a window of opportunity to act, but we will only succeed if the effort is bipartisan. by their presence today, my republican colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix our broken immigration system. we democrats are equally serious. we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much rather, we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problems and becomes law. we recognize that in order to pass bipartisan legislation none of us can get everything we want. that is why our framework says we can address the people living here ille
would line the desert with directional ar o'o's saying -- arrows saying this way to tehran. now, lastly, and i'm running out of time, i hope perhaps you'll resist from applauding at the six-minute mark or at least the 60% of who you are sympathetic to our view. [laughter] drown out the others. is that this is a regime that has threatened to anye light israel and expressed -- annihilate israel and has expressed its intention to do so. we have to rely on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was radically different. the soviets had an ideological argument with the united states. it was not ex stention. and the target. united states was a continental nation of great size. israel is a one-bomb country. [applause] that's a very strong 27th -- 27%. i commend you on your energy. i will stop here and say there's a radical difference between the soviet-u.s. relationship and the relationship with israel and iran and you will not ask six million jews in israel to rely for their existence on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. [applause] >> if it makes yo
. lastly i want to remind everyone that there is an opportunity to submit comments for the record. you can submit materials or public comments to us in one of two ways, either by mail at the u.s. commission on civil rights, office of the general counsel here at 1331 and sylvania avenue northwest, suite 1150, washington, d.c. 204 to five. or you can send it via e-mail to public comments at usc c.r..gov. we look forward to preparing the report and -- that's right. u-lite emotion you wanted to make. >> [inaudible] >> we keep the record open for an additional 15 days, given the level of public interest in the topic spend rather than 30 days we would have 45? >> forty-five. >> we have unanimous consent? so you actually have members of the public 45 days from today to submit your public comments, and we do look forward to preparing and sending our report for finance recommendations from what we've learned here today to the president and congress. thank you, and we adjourned this hearing. [inaudible conversations] >> coming up in a few minutes we will take you to the brookings institution here in
employer or position or perhaps it's something down the road. >> lastly -- unlike the unhappy guys in the movie office space, embrace all sorts of technology. >> by the year 2020, over 75% of jobs will have a technology component. i think that's important for people to understand for longevity and employment of the future. >> staying employed this year will be easier in some fields than in others. for example, jobs in health care and business services like sales are expected to be plentiful. as 2013 goes on, the job market is predicted to pick up steam. setting the stage for better days in the next new year. cnn, washington. >> preparing to fly a plane to new york is pulled from the cockpit for smelling like alcohol. we are following the development. stay with us. you are in "the situation room." s customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this
mandates. states should be given increased flexibility to create efficiencies and achieve results. lastly, congress should not impose maintenance of effort provisions of states as a condition of receiving federal funding. in other words, it states receive federal cuts, washington should not demand the same level of service without providing the same level of funding. essentially, all of these points can and will be coming down to flexibility and partnership. we need the flexibility to take care of the unique needs of our citizens and the challenges of our states. what we do not need is a one- size-fits-all solution or more unfunded federal mandates passed on to our states. the need to be treated as partners, not underlings. we want to work to implement good public policy. as we told congressional leaders, reducing the deficit by shifting costs to the state is not indicative of the good partnership. whether it is deficit reduction or other pressing national issues, we feel the two principles will guide these relationships with the federal government and the state. the principles are the fl
. the saudis would line the deserts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at least the 60% who are not sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intentions to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinger re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that introduction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle priority going forward.
increased flexibility to create efficiencies and achieve results. lastly, congress should not impose maintenance of effort provisions of states as a condition of receiving federal funding. in other words, it states receive federal cuts, washington should not demand the same level of service without providing the same level of funding. essentially, all of these points can and will be coming down to flexibility and partnership. we need the flexibility to take care of the unique needs of our citizens and the challenges of our states. what we do not need is a one- size-fits-all solution or more unfunded federal mandates passed on to our states. the need to be treated as partners, not underlings. we want to work to implement good public policy. as we told congressional leaders, reducing the deficit by shifting costs to the state is not indicative of the good partnership. whether it is deficit reduction or other pressing national issues, we feel the two principles will guide these relationships with the federal government and the state. the principles are the flexibility and the partnershi
would line the desert with directional arrows saying this way to tehran. lastly and i'm running out of time i hope perhaps you'll resist from applauding at the six-minute mark or at least the 60% of you who are sympathetic to our view, drown out the others, is that this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intention to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better henry kissinger re did not get away with it either. >> thank you for that introduction. it is a -- introduction it is a pleasure being here. it goes without saying that the world would be better if iran does not become a nuclear arms state. achieving that goal should be our principle pr
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)